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For the Christian, temptation to steal not too great

Letter: Jim Holsinger Grangeville

In the last few years there have arisen quite a few instances of embezzlement and misuse of funds in Idaho County. Evidently the illicit temptation to quietly steal money was just too great for several individuals. Many people who would never commit armed robbery because of the inherent risks and dangers of stressful, physical confrontation, will nevertheless quietly syphon off monies not their own that they have access to. But just like the bank robber, the embezzler has the power and abuses that power.

Of course, one method of keeping the number of employee and executive thieves down is by a system of checks and verifications, etc., to keep accountability high. But what is needed is that inward accountability, whereby in the conscience of the employee or boss there is the awareness that there is legitimate money that comes to them, such as for services rendered, and then there is money that they have access to that belongs to someone else.

For the Christian – that is, for the real, God-fearing Christian of principle and integrity, there is the similar awareness of a moral line in this fallen world that is not to be crossed. There is money rightfully and legitimately given to them by God for their daily support, and then there is money they have access to – perhaps even a lot of money – that is not given to them by God and that belongs to someone else.

For those of us who belong to Christ, we know that our whole life has been given by God in trust. We know that we have been bought with an exceedingly high price by a man whose whole life was a renunciation of ill-gotten money or any other special privileges, and therefore we are accountable to Him in the life to come for how we have dealt with that which belongs to someone else in this life. For us, as it was for our Savior and example, the illicit temptation to quietly steal money is not too great.

Jim Holsinger

Grangeville

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