News and information from our partners

Elk City News: Candlelight service is Dec. 20e



photo

Jamie Edmondson Elk City 842-2452 elkcitynews@yahoo.com

— Christmas is the time to celebrate the birth of Christ and what better way than to join in with others at the Baptist Church! They will be having their traditional candlelight service on Sunday, Dec. 20 at 6 p.m. They will also be having an open house at the parsonage on Dec. 19 from 4-6 p.m. The community is invited to share fellowship, food and singing.

Full-time child care is needed for a new couple coming to work at the Forest Service. If you would like to apply, contact any of the following: Jeremy Cowie at 406-241-2572, Shaniko Cowie at 406-579-1004 or Sue Phillips at 842-2359.

Dec. 15 was Bill of Rights Day. Maybe it would be a good time to reread that historical, very important document that is still relevant for our day and time. If you need a copy, they are free at the Elk City Hotel gift shop.

Birthdays: Cheryl Sims and Savannah Thompson.

History: “The first gold discovery in Idaho County was at Elk City in 1861. Here rich placers attracted 2,000 people the first year, but by 1872 the best ground was worked out, and the Chinese took over the operations. In 1870 gold-quartz veins were found at the Buster property, but very little gold was mined until 1902. The Buster mine became the largest lode producer in the district and produced about $300,000 in gold between 1907 and 1909 (Lorain, 1938, p. 28). The mines produced fairly steadily from the early 1900s through the 1930s, but since World War II they have been inactive. Placers, on the other hand, were active through 1957.

The early gold production of the district was estimated at $5 to $10 million by Lindgren (1904, p. 84) and at $18 million by Thomson and Ballard (1924, p. 13). From 1902 to 1939 the lodes produced more than $725,000 in gold (Ross, 1941, p. 55) from 1933 to 1959 lodes and placers produced 75,575 ounces. Total production, including the early estimates, was about 550,000 to 800,000 ounces.” (Source: http://www.westernmininghistory.com).



Comments

Use the comment form below to begin a discussion about this content.

Sign in to comment

CLOSE X

Information from the Free-Press and our advertisers (Want to add your business to this to this feed?)