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White Bird News: Rodeo grounds remain closed in order to house fire camp



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Toni Baker 983-7701 toni_wbrodeo@yahoo.com

— Starting date for Grangeville schools is on Aug. 23. This means young ones will be excited so be on your guard for them and always drive carefully.

The Idaho County Fair wrapped up over this last weekend and believe me there were a lot of tears going around from having to sell the animals, but now all their hard work will be just a memory. Then it all starts over again for next year!!

Update on the fire camp at the rodeo arena…it looks like they may be there until October or whenever they get the fire out. So, we are sorry, but it will remain closed to the public until further notice.

No meetings are being held this week so it will be pretty quiet down here again.

Have you ever wondered what your grandparents did for a living, what made them come wes,t or just where your roots began? Come join us at the Idaho County Genealogical Society. We have many books, articles and CDs from Idaho County and beyond. We now have a website, www.idahocountygenealogicalsociety.com. You can also find us on Facebook, so check it out or visit our Library at 111 So. Idaho Street, Grangeville on Wed. thru Fri., 1-4pm (Pacific Time).

The next Brown Bag program will be on Wednesday, Aug. 30, noon. Subject for this one will be Turn of the Century Homes in Grangeville by Annelle Urbahn. Remember, these are in the basement of the Centennial Historical Museum and usually run for about an hour. Bring your lunch and enjoy.

Birthdays this week are: O.C. Abbott, Danna Byrns, Laurie Bonwell (21), Forest Wilson, Jake Schacher, Jessica Robinett, Kadie Whinery (22), Bill Asker, Danny Booze, Kylie McClanahan (23), Bobbie Cook (24), Gary Cook, and Mike Wilt (25). In memory of Carroll Adkison and Anne Hagen (23).

Anniversary wishes go out to Shawn and Kristi Cox (26).

Tidbits: I came across this article and thought it would fit in with the Fires and Forest Service in the area. It is a bit long, but worth the read.

Will Hanover was born Aug. 2, 1882, the son of Dr. William and Minnie Whelihan Hanover and spent his boyhood in Superior and Delvan, Wisconsin. From his mother’s heritage, his Irish grandfather and French grandmother, he inherited a jolly sense of humor and a willingness to work hard for desired results; so that throughout his life he was critically observant and interested in learning all about conditions and in spare time as a lad he assisted his father’s coachman in problems around him, horse care and barn duties, and often on weekends drove his father when making calls on sick patients. He developed a kind and sympathetic feeling towards animals and people.

His mother died when he was 17 and the children were scattered among relatives. After a year or two the doctor married again and made a home in Seattle, Wash. with his new wife and youngest boy and girl. There he practiced medicine until his death twenty some years later. By the time the doctor left Wisconsin, Will was working on a horse and cattle ranch in Nebraska. The owner of it, the summer Will was twenty, paid his train fare and trusted him to care for, on the trip, and deliver 2 fine stallions to a horse dealer at Stites, Idaho and there collect the pay for so doing. There he heard of the mining excitement up Rapid River and after a few months took a stagecoach from Grangeville for Pollock, which was then a thriving village at the mouth of Rapid River and from which place travelers and supplies went to the mine. At a stage stop-over-station-hotel at Goff, Idaho, at the mouth of Race Creek, the ranch owner and proprietor there, J.O. Levander, convinced him that the mine promoters and suppliers made more money than the mine workers, persuaded him to stay on as an all around hired hand. He learned the various pioneer skills necessary to stock and ranch management and in serving the public in the Post Office, store, and stage station. To be continued in next week’s column.



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