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Homes tour:Residents, visitors invited to go on driving, walking tour of turn-of-the-century Grangeville homes


Annelle Urbahn, who helped organize the “Turn of the Century Homes Tour” driving/walking brochure, is seen here in front of The Meadow House, 306 S. Meadow Street. The home was built in 1905 for Mr. Steinheiser. His widow sold the home years later to Dr. J.L. Rains. Dr. Rains for a survivor of the 1879 Sheepeater (Shoshone and Bannock) Indian War.

Photo by Lorie Palmer
Annelle Urbahn, who helped organize the “Turn of the Century Homes Tour” driving/walking brochure, is seen here in front of The Meadow House, 306 S. Meadow Street. The home was built in 1905 for Mr. Steinheiser. His widow sold the home years later to Dr. J.L. Rains. Dr. Rains for a survivor of the 1879 Sheepeater (Shoshone and Bannock) Indian War.



— Are you interested in the history of Grangeville homes? Grab some friends, hop in the car (or go by foot if you’d like the exercise) and go on the “Turn of the Century Homes” tour in Grangeville.

“A brochure was last completed about 27 years ago, but we’ve now updated that and it’s ready for the public,” said Annelle Urbahn, who has helped get the new brochure updated and out. The Urbahn House, 204 E. South First Street, which was built in 1910, is one of the homes on the tour.

Fifteen homes are on the updated brochure, and houses include those built from 1874 to 1910.

“There’s a little more to keeping up a turn-of-the-century home than perhaps a modern home,” Urbahn said. “I believe we need to honor and recognize our area history.” The Urbahn House at 204 E. South First Street is one of the homes on the tour. It was built by Mr. and Mrs. Brust in 1910 an sold to the Albert Urbahn family in 1919.

The brochure lists the homes, addresses and gives a brief history of each. Each home on the list has a sign placed on the property so those on the tour can easily find the residences.

“Each home owner participated and purchased the signs themselves,” Urbahn said.

Brochures are available at the Bicentennial Historical Museum, which sponsored the project. Those wanting a brochure can pick one up there, 305 N. College Street, Grangeville, on Thursdays from 1 to 4 p.m. (winter hours) or call 208-983-2573. They are also available at The Idaho County Genealogical Society, 111 South Idaho Street, Grangeville, which is open Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays, 1 to 4 p.m.

Some of the homes on the brochure include the following:

•Blackmer Funeral Home, 305 N. Mill Street, was built in 1898 for Wallace Scott, early day merchant and banker. It has been used as a funeral home since 1941. Additional owners have included E.M. Olmstead, Glenn Ailor, Bob Hansen and Fred Noland.

•Helena Home, 108 E. S. First Street, was built in 1901 for W.W. Brown, the first mayor of Grangeville and an early day banker. Subsequent owner W.H. Badgero was the proprietor of the Fair Store, a dry-goods and notions establishment. Bob and Terri Helena are the current homeowners.

  •Parker House, 212 S. Hall Street, was built in 1890 for the Aaron Parker family. Mr. Parker was the founder and publisher of the Idaho County Free Press. It is now owned by the Thompson family.

•Laufenberg House, 706 South State Street, was built in 1905. Local dentist G.A. Green and family lived here. Mrs. Green became the first woman in Idaho to obtain an embalming license. The house escaped the fire of 1931. The Laufenberg family owns the home.

•Groom Home, 503 South B Street, has its first deed of recording stating the property is a “Declaration of Homestead” recorded in 1885 to J.W. Crooks. The current structure was built by attorney J.A. Campbell in 1908. The home has been remodeled many times since. Many locals remember this as the home of Woody and Marjorie Fitch. Rob and Teresa Groom have owned the home since 1991.

•Cassius Day Home, 403 N. State Street, was built for Cassius M. Day in 1901. He was the last survivor of the “Brave 17,” heroes of the 1877 Indian War. Well-known Salmon River cattleman George Behean bought the house in the early 1920s. The McLeans now own the home.



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