Sponsored content: Orchids: Winter project, exotic blossoms

Fall weather has ended your outdoor gardening, but you can nurture that green thumb for flowering things through the winter months with an orchid project. Orchids can provide exotic blossoms for months with minimal care.

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ICFP Media for Green Acres

Russ Lindsley is the owner of Green Acres

In nature, orchids grow on other plants and obtain water and nutrients from the air, water and plant debris that accumulates in their environment. This is why they are grown in an orchid mix made of organic material such as peat, fir bark and perlite.

Start with a healthy flowering plant. The phalaenopsis or moth orchid is the most widely available and easiest to grow. It’s similar to caring for an African violet.

Give your orchid a good soaking once a week. Pour off any excess water that collects in the saucer. Don’t allow orchids to sit in water and don’t water them too often.

This can lead to root rot and death of your plant.

Increasing the humidity around the plant by grouping them with other orchids and indoor plants. As one plant loses moisture, or transpires, the others will benefit from the increase in humidity.

Place your plant in a bright location. Orchids do best with 12 to 14 hours of sunlight. Unobstructed south- or east-facing windows are usually the best. Or give plants a boost with artificial lights. Fertilize actively growing plants with an orchid fertilizer.

Start your project now with a visit to Green Acres Nursery in Grangeville, 208-983-0355, www.lindsleysgreenacres.com, and like us on Facebook.

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