Sponsored content: Relic of gold rush days remains at Chinese Cemetery

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The Tire Guy.

Tires get us to places we have to go, and more importantly, destinations we want to go. And North Central Idaho has lots to go see.

Northwest of Warren in a lodgepole pine forest is the Chinese Cemetery. This is the only ethnic Chinese cemetery in Idaho that is listed on the National Register of Historic Places (March 29, 1994).

Its history begins with the gold rush of 1848 that brought Chinese immigrants to California to work in the gold fields, railroad camps, fish canneries and the southwestern agricultural production. This spread beyond California, with immigrants arriving in Idaho in the 1860s.

From 1870 to 1900, it is estimated that 600 to 1,200 Chinese influenced the social and cultural composition of the Warren Mining District, and at least 12 Chinese mining companies monopolized the gravel placers.

The cemetery was created to hold the remains of Chinese migrant laborers, estimated to have been used from 1870 to 1890.

The site is currently under management of the Payette National Forest, and a short interpretive trail leads from the Warren Wagon Road to the cemetery. To find it, from McCall, travel north on Warren Wagon Road for 48 miles. Just before the town of Warren, there is a gravel pullout adjacent to a waterway with an interpretive sign. Hikers will find a trail leading north with additional signs and directions.

Ready to travel? Check out The Tire Guy for your vehicle needs, as well as for roadside tire assistance. We’re here to help get you places: 208-816-8040 (ask for Rick) or 208-962-3241 (shop), 502 Main Street in Cottonwood.

Northwest of Warren in a lodgepole pine forest is the Chinese Cemetery. This is the only ethnic Chinese cemetery in Idaho that is listed on the National Register of Historic Places (March 29, 1994).

Its history begins with the gold rush of 1848 that brought Chinese immigrants to California to work in the gold fields, railroad camps, fish canneries and the southwestern agricultural production. This spread beyond California, with immigrants arriving in Idaho in the 1860s.

From 1870 to 1900, it is estimated that 600 to 1,200 Chinese influenced the social and cultural composition of the Warren Mining District, and at least 12 Chinese mining companies monopolized the gravel placers.

The cemetery was created to hold the remains of Chinese migrant laborers, estimated to have been used from 1870 to 1890.

The site is currently under management of the Payette National Forest, and a short interpretive trail leads from the Warren Wagon Road to the cemetery. To find it, from McCall, travel north on Warren Wagon Road for 48 miles. Just before the town of Warren, there is a gravel pullout adjacent to a waterway with an interpretive sign. Hikers will find a trail leading north with additional signs and directions.

Ready to travel? Check out The Tire Guy for your vehicle needs, as well as for roadside tire assistance. We’re here to help get you places: 208-816-8040 (ask for Rick) or 208-962-3241 (shop), 502 Main Street in Cottonwood.

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