News and information from our partners

Library makes updates to young adult reading area; June 11 is sign up for summer reading program

Refurbished tables, new coats of paint, new books and media plug-in towers are all part of a redone young adult area at Grangeville’s Centennial Library.

Photo by Lorie Palmer
Refurbished tables, new coats of paint, new books and media plug-in towers are all part of a redone young adult area at Grangeville’s Centennial Library.



— Thanks to several grants and local volunteer help, Grangeville Centennial Library is making some changes.

Most notable is the brightly painted and redecorated young adult area.

“One of our library aides, Nicole Hill, did the painting and the refurbishing of tables,” said librarian Angie Norman.

The bright greens, purples and geometric shapes add vitality to the area that is meant to entice teenagers.

Powered docking towers for cell phones, computers, etc., are in the middle of groups of tables which have been fitted with photos, sayings and decorations then epoxied.

“The towers can accommodate several plugins at a time as well as USB cords,” Norman said.

Of course, new books were also purchased for the young adult reader, she added.

In addition, a 3D printer, which has been used for a variety of classes and groups, sits in the section where viewers can watch it print.

“We have software that people can test out but right now, the staff is in charge of the actual printer,” she explained.

In addition, the Department of Labor donated cubicles and desks and refurbished computers are now set up in the back area.

photo

Angie Norman

“This offers a little more privacy for those people who work on personal things on the computer, such as their banking or bill paying,” Norman said.

STEM, Laura Moore Cunningham and Grangeville Community Foundation grants, as well as Friends of the Centennial Library (FOCL) have paid for the improvements, along with some funds from the regular library budget.

“We couldn’t do this without the great community and volunteers we have,” Norman emphasized.

Summer reading programs are the next activities to be on board and it’s a big endeavor.

“We want kids to stop in now and sign up for the programs they are interested in, so we have an idea,” Norman said. Official sign-up is set for June 11. Programs will be available for those birth to 18.

This year, those participating will be asked to read 10 hours each and then their names will be entered in drawings by age group for a variety of prizes. Different reading program activities are currently scheduled, and the full list will be available by June 11. Local businesses and organizations are stepping up to provide instruction and supplies.

Volunteers – older kids and teens as well as adults – are still needed to help with summer programs.

Anyone wanting to help can stop by the library or call: 215 W. North St.; 208-983-0951.



Comments

Use the comment form below to begin a discussion about this content.

Sign in to comment

CLOSE X

Information from the Free-Press and our advertisers (Want to add your business to this to this feed?)