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Lochsa River Corridor nomination decision pushed back to March 2

A map that shows approximately the boundaries of the area nominated as the Lochsa River Corridor TCP (Traditional Cultural Place) was among the documents presented by Idaho State Historical Society leaders to the general public Sept. 12 in Grangeville.

Idaho State Historical Society
A map that shows approximately the boundaries of the area nominated as the Lochsa River Corridor TCP (Traditional Cultural Place) was among the documents presented by Idaho State Historical Society leaders to the general public Sept. 12 in Grangeville.



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Nakia Williamson

Previous reports regarding the Lochsa River Corridor (Traditional Cultural Place)

The Free Press has previously reported on the Lochsa River Corridor Traditional Cultural Place nomination. Click below to read the articles that came before.

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A man in the crowd for a meeting regarding the nomination of the Lochsa River Corridor Traditional Cultural Place to the National Register of Historic Places Sept. 12.

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Earl Bennett

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Janet Gallimore

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Tricia Canaday

— Though there were about 80 seats set out beforehand in the conference room, it was standing room only Wednesday night, Sept. 12, at the Grangeville Super 8. Local politicians, Lochsa River-area landowners and others who said their interests are at stake in a pending decision came to make commentary before the Historic Sites Review Board decides. That board's decision had been scheduled to take place in Sandpoint 10 days after this one, but after introducing those at the head table, Idaho State Historical Society executive director Janet Gallimore's first words were to announce the board's decision had been deferred to the board's spring meeting, tentatively scheduled for March 2. Late in the meeting, a voice from the back of the room asked her to arrange for a bigger venue.

At issue is whether or not a vast tract of Lochsa River country, which officials described as about 750,000 acres in size, may be listed on the National Parks Service's register of historic places.

Deputy state historical preservation officer Tricia Canaday explained how the nomination process works and said the process required her office to send notices to Idaho County and the Idaho County Historic Preservation Commission 60 days in advance of the Historic Sites Review Board decision: "to allow for them to go through a public process to determine if they feel the property should be recommended for listing, or not."

"If the local elected officials and the historic preservation commission recommend that a property not be listed, the state will take no further action on the nomination," she explained, "unless we receive an appeal within 30 days."

Canaday went on to say private property owners have the right to object to the listing of their property in the National Register of Historic Places.

"If the majority of property owners object to that listing, the property may not be listed by the National Parks Service," she explained. "That's 'may not' in the sense that they are not allowed to list it."

To formally register their objection, a property owner may send a notarized letter to the Idaho State Historical Society at 2205 Old Penitentiary Rd., Boise, ID, 83712.

The Free Press will make a full report in the Sept. 19 paper of what else transpired during the Sept. 12 meeting, and will continue to report on this matter through its conclusion.



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