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40 turn out for Grangeville meeting on Lochsa historic preservation

A map that shows approximately the boundaries of the area nominated as the Lochsa River Corridor TCP (Traditional Cultural Place) was among the documents presented by Idaho State Historical Society leaders to the general public Sept. 12 in Grangeville.

Idaho State Historical Society
A map that shows approximately the boundaries of the area nominated as the Lochsa River Corridor TCP (Traditional Cultural Place) was among the documents presented by Idaho State Historical Society leaders to the general public Sept. 12 in Grangeville.



About 40 attendees signed in for the meeting Idaho Historic Preservation Office personnel put on Wednesday night, Jan. 9, at the Grangeville Community Center, where SHPO administrator Tricia Canaday spoke for about 10 minutes and fielded questions for about an hour.

Previous reports regarding the Lochsa River Corridor (Traditional Cultural Place)

The Free Press has previously reported on the Lochsa River Corridor Traditional Cultural Place nomination. Click below to read the articles that came before.

Under discussion was a nomination of about 750,000 acres of Lochsa River country for listing on the National Register of Historic Places which was put forward by the Nez Perce Tribe last year and which is subject to objections some owners of private property had already formalized.

Those in attendance presented a range of concerns, including about 15 minutes of philosophical discussion between Canaday and Mike Edmondson of Elk City. Edmondson questioned by speaking of his concerns for Christian religion, American history and expansive regulation, and Canaday answered by speaking of the historic preservation program’s respect for freedom of religion, the program’s recognition of Native American archaeological sites as part of American history and the program’s stability over time.

After the long exchange, Idaho State Historical Society district trustee Earl Bennett of Genesee said: “I hope everybody here tonight will go home with at least one thing. Those 100-plus-or-minus-a-couple landowners in this proposed area need to send their letters in to SHPO. If you do not send a letter – this is not an election – it counts as a de facto yes. You’re essentially approving it by not sending in a letter. … It needs to be the majority of that 100 people that, if they’re against it, can stop this process just like that.”

One of many questioners to follow asked SHPO to provide a complete accounting of exactly how many have objected, and to provide the information ahead of a meeting SHPO has planned to hold on the same topic at 6 p.m. Jan. 14 at the Kooskia Community Center.

The exact count matters, Canaday explained to the Grangeville crowd, because if more than 50 percent of the private owners within the nomination boundary formally object, the nomination – formally known as the Lochsa River Corridor Traditional Cultural Place – will not be listed.

SHPO distributed copies of the list of property owners within the nomination boundary – a list current as of Jan. 9 – which Canaday said reflects counts of approximately 120 property owners, 37 or 38 of whom have formally objected.

The Free Press has requested a copy of SHPO’s most current list of landowners and objections received, and will update this post with the most current counts as soon as the information becomes available.



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