Editorials

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Prescription medication abuse thrives partially on lack of understanding

Prescription medication misuse and abuse is not exclusively a big-city problem; it’s here – right here in rural Idaho — and we have work to do to raise public awareness about the problem.

Tactless statement disrespects our heritage

Let’s just say we’re more than just disappointed in our Dist. 7 State Senator Sheryl Nuxoll’s performance last week.

Smarter Sentencing Act: how legislating should be

Good solutions that cut out wasted spending and arbitrary decision-making. Empowering individuals to serve justice.

Still needed: responsible budgeting

The U.S. Congressional Budget Office’s (CBO) annual Budget and Economic Outlook report shows that, absent action, the United States continues to remain on an unsustainable fiscal path with the national debt expected to grow by $9 trillion during the course of the next 10 years. According to CBO, the cost of the interest payments alone on the debt are expected to rise by 5.6 trillion, which would account for roughly 13.5 percent of total annual federal spending.

Credit for Rep. Shepherd on representing district

Our Dist. 7B Representative Paul Shepherd recently came under fire for proposing the state make a custom license plate featuring the Orofino Maniacs logo, a portion of sales ($12) from which would benefit their schools.

Make it harder for scammers the next time

“My name is Mrs. Glenda Buthelezi. I am a South African and a financial consultant working with a financial institution. I am contacting you to partner with me to secure the funds ($34M) kept in the custody of a bank in South Africa by one of former associate of the late president of Libya who is now deceased.”

SRS issue: Time to send the feds an invoice?

When highway district representatives, county commissioners and state elected officials came together Saturday for a meeting on a world without Secure Rural Schools (SRS) funds, two things came to mind.

Measure of local control for rural districts in tapping alumni

The topic of education funding in Idaho gets folks from zero to 100 mph in a hurry. When Governor Butch Otter hosted the Capital for a Day event in Kamiah Jan. 16, he and state officials got the brunt of local frustration with both barrels. Here are two quotes drawn from the Lewiston Tribune of that day’s questioning:

Pro-wolf movement should support accurate, scientific animal count

Estimating – as grade-school students learn at young ages – is a way of counting that is useful for figuring out the number of small things inside a bigger thing. But when a state wildlife biologist sets out to estimate the number of wolves in Idaho, she does not gaze at a map like a child guessing blindly at the number of M&Ms a gallon jar may hold. Instead, wildlife biologists rely on scientific methods.

In praise of Idaho’s youngest hobbyist lobbyist

Student embodies political passion

Symbols mean something different to everyone who looks at them. They are matters of opinion, but when widely-shared, symbols can unite communities as large as nations around a shared sense of values. When enshrined in law, mere symbols can shape what about our society will stand the test of time.

Local officials: Take up Otter’s example and invite public to comment

Public turnout at last Friday’s Idaho-Lewis Capital for a Day event showed lots of folks had questions for their governor and public officials.

Pot legalization, lawsuits and what Idaho can learn

On July 1, Oregon’s legalized marijuana goes into effect, putting Idaho in the center of a shrinking circle of Western states – including Utah and Wyoming – where the use, possession, sale, cultivation and transportation of cannabis is illegal.

Even an hour makes an impact

Recently, Idaho has been named in more than one poll as in the top three states for volunteering.

Local impact with elections in 2015

Sorry to spoil your festivities planning for the new year, but elections are coming up.

‘Good news of great joy...’

In those days Caesar Augustus issued a decree that a census should be taken of the entire Roman world. (This was the first census that took place while Quirinius was governor of Syria.) And everyone went to his own town to register.