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The stage is set: Early April is when Idaho’s mountain snowpack generally reaches its peak snow water content, “… and things are looking interesting for the water supply picture,” said Ron Abramovich, Water Supply Specialist for the Idaho Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS). According to the April water supply outlook report, precipitation since the water year started on Oct. 1, 2017, varies across the state with watersheds ranging from 85 to 120 percent of normal.

Regional snowpack levels are above average, according to the latest water supply outlook report from the Natural Resources Conservation Service. Currently, the highest snowpacks are in the Clearwater Basin where, collectively, they are 110 percent of normal.

Regionally, the water season is above average for the region, while for Idaho overall it is off to a slow start, according to the Natural Resources Conservation Service’s (NRCS) first outlook report for the 2018 year. Precipitation since the water year started on Oct. 1, 2017, varies across the state with watersheds ranging from 70 to 130 percent of normal.

Data released this month through the Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) water supply outlook report shows a solid snowpack still exists above 8,000 feet in the central mountains, and in most basins, the remaining high elevation snowpack is more than twice normal.

It’s “water, water everywhere,’ according to the Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) that reports precipitation levels are above or well above average across Idaho, since the water year started last October.

There is no shortage of water across the state based on a report released by the Natural Resources Conservation Service. Precipitation is above average since the water year started Oct. 1, 2016, and several other basins are seeing the highest snowpack in 20 years.

UPDATE, Jan. 9 - When travel will resume is undetermined at this point, following a Sunday night closure of U.S. Highway 12, east of Kooskia, due to avalanche danger. Threats to safety were too high to allow motorists to traverse the route, according to Jake Melder, spokesman for the Idaho Transportation Department.